Charcuterie

Food — By Crust on March 7, 2010

The Charcuterie at Boneta is always changing and it is always wonderful. It is the meat guys responsibility to keep the charcuterie coming and right now that guy is Scotty DIcks. Pictured here is some of his incredible work, that got sent to us after our last graveyard shift. The oval one is soppressata, a pork salami, with chili flakes that has been pressed and dry cured. Also on there is the land jager, a pork/beef sausage that has been dry cured. The last is sauccison sec, a simple dry cured pork sausage. We also received the duck liver pate that I made. Everything on the board, including the board is house made, the bread and the mustard and the pickles. The salt and the butter aren’t house made. I think we should make the butter in house. The charcuterie is always different, so you never know what you’re going to get.

10 Comments

  1. nicole says:

    That looks so good!! I love charcuterie. David and I are trying to make duck breast prosciutto this weekend. I will let you know how it goes…in three weeks!

  2. Troy says:

    I agree… this looks delicious!

  3. Matt R. says:

    We’ve got another 10 days or so on the last round of duck prosciutto and it ought to be pretty good! Seems like lots of restaurants are doing this kind of thing in house now, and it’s a trend I can really sink my teeth into!

  4. David Zilber says:

    Le sigh…. Tasty.

  5. Joachim says:

    Yeah, the entire work of staff that’s all gone, boards made by Segue and the rest made with lots of research by Travis and I, really never helped by Jérémie who’s now taking all the credit!
    As for the salt you could also make salt flakes but what’s the point, almost everyone is leaving it, aren’t saussages already salted;.)

  6. scott says:

    the thought of you implying that the charcuterie died when you and travis left is as ridiculous as it is insulting. i work my ass off every single day, at work and not, to make sure that everything is fantastic. doing my own tests, experiments, and research. everything on there is just as good, if not better than before. i don’t take anything away from what you guys did then, and i would like to assume that you would respect the fact that i am taking what travis taught me and making it my own.

  7. Colleen says:

    Such sour grapes Joachim!

    When you have your own place then you can take the credit for the work of your team. Because that is what it is…a team effort. The fact that you are so short-sighted to place such negative press for yourself and your buddy Travis, shows the immaturity that you have.

    And teaching other people skills should be source of pride for you, not a sore spot.

    Oh well. Enjoy your self-pity.

  8. scott says:

    i dont agree with coleen…..credit should only be given when its due, the leader of a team should never be given more credit than the team. but i do see eye to eye that the passing of knowledge, technique and inspiration should be a point of pride for both the teacher and the student.

  9. Colleen says:

    I agree that credit should only be given when due, Scott…..but unfortunately, the media look to a representative of each team to feature, and that usually ends up being the leader of the team.

    If the leader of said team points out individuals to the media that deserve extra credit, then good on them! But most of the time, the media don’t care about the little guy, the grunts behind the scenes. The other thing is that giving extra credit takes away from the whole TEAM mentality, and creates egos that cause problems.

    Now, if you are saying that the MENU should have yours, or whoever’s name on it under the charcuterie section…..well, that is a different scenario. I agree with that, but once again, can lead to attitudes like our friend Joachim’s here.

    The system is unfair, to be sure. But the point is that it takes a team to make a restaurant run, and anyone who thinks that they are more important than the rest of the team (down to the dishwashers) is living in a dreamworld. I have accepted my role within each team that I have worked in, and have worked hard to get my small amount of credit. But I never expected credit, nor have I expected people to bow before me and my brilliance.

    I teach, I continue to learn, and I work hard. This attitude has paid me off in spades.

  10. scott says:

    i really dont have an interest in getting involved in a big debate……..joachim, you’re wrong and dont know what youre talking about. coleen, we don’t/won’t see eye to eye on many things.

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